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Yelp, Happy With iOS Mobile Reviews, Expands Feature To Android

After about two months of what you could call an iOS-only test, Yelp is now letting Android users write reviews directly from their mobile device, too.
Yelp didn’t allow its users to write reviews on mobile devices until launching that feature on iOS back in August. The company’s logic was that reviews written from mobile devices would be shorter and lower quality, hit-and-run style — and might even skew toward negative outbursts in the heat of the moment after a bad experience. Its mobile apps only allowed users to post brief tips, not full reviews.
But in its announcement yesterday, Yelp says the mobile reviews that iOS users have posted have been good:
For those who wondered if the ability to write reviews instantly would lead to more rants and raves in the heat of the moment, we found that star ratings for reviews written on mobile closely mirror what we see on the desktop site, with about 80% of reviews being 3, 4 and 5 stars. Consumers are clearly taking the time to write thoughtfu…

How To Update An Entire Dashboard In Excel With One Radio Button [VIDEO]

I’ve been writing a series on how to create dashboards in Excel that started with this post on Search Engine Land and carried over to Marketing Land. Now, I’m going to show you a trick that will give you the ability to control an entire dashboard with one menu — in this example, a radio button menu.
In the sample file I’m including, I’ve put months in the menu at the top of the dashboard, but you could put anything in there to segment your charts and tables:

countries
marketing channels
departments in a company
sales staff
traffic source
affiliates
etc.

Just as I mentioned in my last post, when you’re creating an interactive dashboard, I highly recommend that you put your raw and calculated data into separate worksheets from your dashboard. I name my worksheets Dashboard, Raw Data, and Calculated Data (this is pretty standard among analysts), but you can use whatever best helps you to keep track of everything.
The Chart We’ll Be Creating
Here is a screenshot of the chart you’ll learn how to crea…

Picking Keywords for Your eCommerce Sites

Selecting keywords for an eCommerce site can be a challenging endeavor. Knowing how to properly research, select and evaluate keywords […]
The post Picking Keywords for Your eCommerce Sites appeared first on The Next SEO: All About Social Media News | Social Media Tips and Tricks.




via The Next SEO: All About Social Media News | Social Media Tips and Tricks

Marketing Day: October 10, 2013

Here’s our daily recap of what happened in online marketing today, as reported on Marketing Land and other places across the web.
From Marketing Land:

Facebook To Retire Who Can Look Me Up” Search Setting, Finalizing Changes Announced Last Year

Facebook announced today it would be completing the removal of its “Who can look up my timeline by name?” search setting. Last December, the company announced the search setting would be automatically retired for users no longer taking advantage of it, with a “small percentage of people” still using the search setting able to access […]

Microsoft Joins the Anti-Cookie Movement, Working On Its Own Replacement

Following news that Google is likely working to replace the much-maligned cookie for tracking and ad targeting on the web, Ad Age is reporting Microsoft is working on its own cookie-replacement technology. Microsoft is apparently developing technology that would run on its own devices and platforms including Windows desktops, tablets and smartph…

Facebook To Retire Old Search Setting, Finalizing Changes Announced Last Year

Facebook announced today it would be completing the removal of its “Who can look up my timeline by name?” search setting.
Last December, the company announced the search setting would be automatically retired for users no longer taking advantage of it, with a “small percentage of people” still using the search setting able to access it.
With today’s announcement, any users who still have access to the “Who can look up my timeline by name” search setting will begin seeing the following reminder that the setting is soon to be retired:

The search setting allowed users to control if they could be found when their name was typed into the search bar. According to Facebook, the introduction of its Graph Search and the site’s advanced search capabilities, limited the setting’s reach:
The setting was created when Facebook was a simple directory of profiles and it was very limited. For example, it didn’t prevent people from navigating to your Timeline by clicking your name in a story in News Feed, …

Microsoft Joins the Anti-Cookie Movement, Working On Its Own Replacement

Following news that Google is likely working to replace the much-maligned cookie for tracking and ad targeting on the web, Ad Age is reporting Microsoft is working on its own cookie-replacement technology.
Microsoft is apparently developing technology that would run on its own devices and platforms including Windows desktops, tablets and smartphones, Xbox, Bing and Internet Explorer. Microsoft’s ownership of these various products enables it to replace the cookie with what Ad Age says is essentially a device identifier that users would opt-into when accepting the usual terms of service agreement. That would give Microsoft the ability to offer advertisers the cross-device and cross-platform tracking their so desperate for.
“Not only would [Microsoft] be building out an ad ID, but they would also be building out a cross-channel attribution model, which everybody wants,” The Media Kitchen president Barry Lowenthal told Ad Age.
The need to find an alternative to the browser based third-party…

New @EventParrot Twitter Experiment Delivers Breaking News Via Direct Message

Twitter isn’t saying anything officially, but by all appearances the company has launched a new experiment that could increase user engagement and retention.
The experiment is simple: Anyone that follows the @EventParrot account will start to get breaking news delivered via direct messages.
It functions much the same as the @MagicRecs experiment that Twitter launched this summer.
I followed the account late last night, and this DM arrived overnight:

A Twitter spokesperson declined to say if the account is official or not, but you can be sure it is. The profile begins with, “This is a Twitter experiment” and — as TechCrunch points out — almost all of the account’s original followers are Twitter employees. It has all the signs of being official.
The account addresses a longstanding problem that Twitter has faced, particularly one that impacts new users: how to deliver (or find) relevant and meaningful content in the growing stream of tweets. It’s been reported over the years that many new us…