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As Tile makes a long-term B2B play, its CMO says he’s right where he loves to be

In November of last year, Simon Fleming-Wood was named CMO of Tile, the company behind RFID hardware devices designed to help users keep track of things like lost keys or phones. In his role, the CMO oversees all marketing and communications efforts for the brand, including brand strategy, growth marketing, advertising and PR.

“It’s an exciting time to be in the role as the company is really expanding their retail footprint, introducing new products, making a long-term B2B play and really owning their category,” says Fleming-Wood. “That’s right where I love to be.”

Currently, Fleming-Wood’s team is focused on a brand strategy campaign that will launch during the holiday season.

“Tile has roughly 90 percent share of a category they created, but it’s still a category with low awareness overall, so there’s a real opportunity to build a meaningful brand here.”

Tile is also planning promotions around its Smart Location Platform. Launched last year, the new platform makes it possible for companies to embed Tile’s technology into their own products.

“It’s our vision for the future — where other brands can easily integrate our tech into their products,” says Fleming-Wood.

Before joining Tile, Fleming-Wood served as Pandora’s CMO, taking the music site’s marketing organization from a team of two to a team of 50. The CMO says the six months he took off between leaving Pandora and joining Tile was the first time in his career he had taken time for himself.

In today’s “Get to Know” column, Fleming-Wood shares why those six months were so special, as well as the business leaders he most admires, and the last book he read that impacted his ideas around marketing.

[Read the full article on MarTech Today.]



via Marketing Land

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