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Showing posts from April 9, 2019
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A survival kit for SEO-friendly JavaScript websites

JavaScript-powered websites are here to stay. As JavaScript in its many frameworks becomes an ever more popular resource for modern websites, SEOs must be able to guarantee their technical implementation is search engine-friendly.In this article, we will focus on how to optimize JS-websites for Google (although Bing also recommends the same solution, dynamic rendering).The content of this article includes:1.    JavaScript challenges for SEO2.    Client-side and server-side rendering3.    How Google crawls websites4.    How to detect client-side rendered content5.    The solutions: Hybrid rendering and dynamic rendering1. JavaScript challenges for SEOReact, Vue, Angular, Node, and Polymer. If at least one of these fancy names rings a bell, then most likely you are already dealing with a JavaScript-powered website.All these JavaScript frameworks provide great flexibility and power to modern websites.They open a large range of possibilities in terms of client-side rendering (like allowin…

Using technology to plan an effective people-based audience activation strategy

As the marketing world has grown increasingly “digital-first,” data has become more pervasive, and as it surges in scale, marketers find it more difficult to ascertain its value. One would think that with more data, understanding value would be much easier; however, many know this isn’t true. When your audiences range from first-party CRM data to third-party acquired data and everything in between, without a defined identity strategy, you will lack clarity around whom you are talking to and how they prefer to communicate.The influences of a digital-first world are having a direct impact on advertisers. The promise of more accurate and scalable data is becoming a reality through people-based marketing but understanding how to best leverage identity across various data sources, platforms, and customer touchpoints are becoming increasingly complex.Typical challenges faced by advertisers include:How do I activate my offline CRM data for digital marketing and maintain a persistent view of …

How the New York Times applied marketing technology to triple subscriptions

New York Times VP of engineering Kristian Kristensen and director of product marketing technology Pamela Della Motta. SAN JOSE, CA — The New York Times print advertising business experienced a sudden shock in 2008 when the paper lost most of its ad revenue nearly overnight.“All of a sudden the subscription revenue was higher than advertising,” said Kristian Kristensen, The Times VP of engineering. Now there is a 70-30 split between the New York Times’ subscription revenue and its advertising revenue, with 70 percent of the paper’s revenue coming from subscriptions. Before print advertising revenue shrunk, this split used to be flipped.In 2017, the New York Times published its 2020 Report outlining the newsroom’s strategy and aspirations and making it clear the New York Times was a subscription-first business. Since 2014, the paper has tripled its subscriber number from one million to 3.5 million, with a goal of growing its subscription base to 10 million by 2025.The need for a martech …

How to wed multiple martech stacks when companies merge

Poly’s Zack Alves, LogMeIn’s Justin Sharaf and CabinetM’s Sheryl Schultz. SAN JOSE, CA — “If you are in marketing operations right now, you know that rationalizing a single stack is hard. Bringing together two stacks or more is really complex,” said CabinetM COO Sheryl Schultz at this year’s MarTech Conference.Schultz moderated the “When Stacks Collide” session featuring Poly (formerly Plantronics) senior manager of marketing technology Zack Alves and LogMeIn director of marketing operations Justin Sharaf. Both Alves and Sharaf have led their teams through major company acquisitions, having to manage the process of integrating multiple martech stacks into one stack that met everyone’s needs.Three rules for blending stacks. LogMeIn has acquired more than ten companies in the past seven years, at one time growing from 1,200 to 3,500 employees in one afternoon. To manage the chaos of bringing two separate martech stacks together at such times, Sharaf has developed three specific rules.He …